Methods and Measurement Council

The Methods and Measurement Council comprises some of the brightest and most talented people in the field of criminal justice research and measurement who help revise and ratify MFJ’s measures, which were originally developed by MFJ’s Data Council. Current Methods and Measurement Council members include:

Chief Strategy Officer, Seattle Police Department

Christopher Fisher has spent his entire career working to guide the development of public policy through action-oriented research. Before joining the Seattle Police Department, Chris served as a Senior Policy Advisor for the Council of State Governments Justice Center, and before that as Director of Analysis & Integrated Solutions in the New York City Mayor’s Office of Criminal Justice. In this role he worked to coordinate the planning, analysis, and evaluation of inter-agency efforts to solve place-based criminal justice challenges in New York City through data integration and cooperative service delivery.

Chris has served in similar capacities for other New York City criminal justice agencies including the New York City Police Department, the Department of Probation, the Administration for Children’s Services, and the former Department of Juvenile Justice. In each of these positions he was charged with expanding the agencies’ research capacity and engaging academic research partners to bolster the scope of information examined to support operations.

Before working with the City of New York, he was a Senior Research Assistant with the Criminal Justice Research and Evaluation Center at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice, where he helped lead research projects supporting New York State and City government programs and other violence and substance abuse prevention and intervention programs.

Chris earned his B.A. in Psychology from the University of Virginia, his M.A. in Criminal Justice from John Jay College of Criminal Justice, and his Ph.D. in Criminal Justice from the City University of New York – Graduate Center.

Professor, Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice, University of Maryland, College Park

Brian D. Johnson is a Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Maryland. He received his Ph.D. in Crime, Law & Justice in 2003 from the Pennsylvania State University. His dissertation was supported by the Forrest Crawford Fellowship for Ethical Inquiry and received the Penn State Alumni Association Dissertation Award.

In 2008 Brian received the American Society of Criminology Ruth Shonle Cavan Young Scholar Award. His current research interests include contextual variations in sentencing, racial and ethnic relations in society, and the use of advanced statistical modeling techniques to study criminal processes.

Vice President and Research Director, Vera Institute of Justice, New York

Jim Parsons is the Vice President and Research Director at the Vera Institute of Justice and Principal Investigator in Vera’s International Indicators Group. Among other projects, he is currently directing research on the impact of recent reforms to drug law sentencing policies in New York City, developing research led jail reentry initiatives in New York and Los Angeles, and working with criminal justice and behavioral health agencies in Washington, D.C., to inform the provision of forensic substance use and mental health treatment services.

Jim’s international work includes a project for the United Nations to develop and test indicators of justice system performance for use in post-conflict settings, and a long-term initiative to develop and evaluate justice system reform projects in China.

Jim has published on empirical research methods for improving justice systems, jail reentry services, the use of indicators to evaluate justice system performance, and public health interventions targeting substance users.

Professor, School of Criminal Justice, Rutgers University, Newark

Andres F. Rengifo is an Associate Professor and M.A. Program Director at Rutgers School of Criminal Justice, and received his Ph.D. in Criminal Justice from the City University of New York (CUNY) Graduate Center – John Jay College in 2007. His research focuses primarily on the macro-level intersection between sentencing policies and imprisonment. He also studies social networks, and urban crime and disorder.

Andres’s current areas of interest include the study of corrections’ policy and innovation at the state and local levels, the evolution of co-offending networks over time and space, and comparative work on issues of public safety and crime control in Latin America (Colombia, Venezuela, Dominican Republic, Chile, Jamaica). Andres is also a Research Fellow at the Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University (Program in Criminal Justice Policy and Management).

Director of Research, Council for State Governments Justice Center, Austin

Jessica Saunders is a senior research scientist the Institute for Public Research, CNA. Prior, she was a criminologist at the RAND Corporation with over fifteen years of experience conducting research related to the criminal justice system. Her research interests include policing, evaluation research, and quantitative methods.

Saunders has led several large-scale criminal justice and prevention evaluation efforts, including a multi-site open-air drug market intervention evaluation, NIJ's predictive policing evaluation, a large scale NIJ-funded school safety program evaluation, the Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center for Small, Rural, Tribal, and Border Criminal Justice Systems, an examination of the Israel National Police, and the effectiveness of correctional education.

Jessica has authored a series of statistical and methodological pieces on emerging statistical techniques for measuring the development of delinquency and youth violence and their implications for youth intervention evaluations, as well as advanced new quantitative methods to overcome sampling bias when using quasi-experimental and observational data at the individual and geographic level for evaluation research. She spent five months in Afghanistan studying both the development and effectiveness of Afghan local police and U.S. military women working in combat positions for NATO Special Forces.

Council Chair
Associate Professor, Chairperson and Director of Sociolegal Studies Minor, Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Loyola University Chicago

Don Stemen is an Associate Professor in the Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology at Loyola University Chicago. For three years, he was MFJ’s first Consulting Director of Research & Analytics responsible for shaping MFJ’s research agenda, heightening its real-world impact, strengthening its research funding base, and promoting and sustaining collaboration with MFJ’s government and private partners.

Prior to joining Loyola in 2007, he was the Director of Research for Sentencing and Corrections at the Vera Institute of Justice. His research explores the innovation and diffusion of sentencing and corrections policies in the United States, the macro-level intersection between sentencing policies and imprisonment, and the micro-level impact of sentencing policies on the use of discretion. He has completed numerous federally-funded and foundation-funded projects examining the effects of sentencing policies on incarceration rates in the United States, the impact of mandatory treatment and probation programs on recidivism, and the decision-making processes of prosecutors.

Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice, University of Maryland, College Park

Min Xie is an Associate Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Maryland. She received her Ph.D. in Criminal Justice in 2007 from State University of New York at Albany. Her dissertation received the University at Albany Outstanding Dissertation Award. In 2012 she received the American Society of Criminology Ruth Shonle Cavan Young Scholar Award. Her research interests include theories of criminal victimization, race/ethnicity and gender issues, multilevel and longitudinal models, and spatial data analysis. She is currently conducting research on immigration and violent victimization using funding from the National Institute of Justice and the Bureau of Justice Statistics.

Benchmarking Council

The Benchmarking Council is a senior advisory group comprised of well-known and highly respected criminologists, all of whom have had an important impact on criminal justice theory and practice in the past few decades. The group also includes a member who pioneered the field of pain measurement in medicine. The Benchmarking Council vets MFJ's measures and methodology, but the main focus of their work is on devising ways to help people better understand what the data mean. To this end, they are developing benchmarks MFJ will test with stakeholders across all our states. Current Benchmarking Council members include:

Council Chair
University Professor, School of Criminal Justice, Rutgers University, Newark

Dr. Todd Clear is a former Provost at Rutgers University-Newark, and former Dean of the School of Criminal Justice. Todd received his Ph.D. in Criminal Justice from the University at Albany, and has also held professorships at Ball State University, Florida State University (where he was also Associate Dean of the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice) and John Jay College of Criminal Justice (where he held the rank of Distinguished Professor).

Todd has authored 13 books and over 100 articles and book chapters. His most recent book is The Punishment Imperative, by NYU Press. Todd has also written on community justice, correctional classification, prediction methods in correctional programming, community-based correctional methods, intermediate sanctions, and sentencing policy, and is currently involved in studies of the criminological implications of “place,” and the economics of justice reinvestment.

Todd has served as president of The American Society of Criminology, The Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, and The Association of Doctoral Programs in Criminology and Criminal Justice. His work has been recognized through several awards, including those of the American Society of Criminology, the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, The Rockefeller School of Public Policy, the American Probation and Parole Association, the American Correctional Association, and the International Community Corrections Association.

Todd is also the founding editor of the journal Criminology & Public Policy, published by the American Society of Criminology.

Professor, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester, Rochester

Bob Dworkin is a Professor of Anesthesiology at University of Rochester and founder of The Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT), which develops consensus reviews and recommendations for improving the design, execution, and interpretation of clinical trials of treatments for pain with the FDA at its side.

Executive Director, Institute for State & Local Governance at the City University of New York

Prior to joining CUNY in May 2013 to help create the Institute for State and Local Governance, Michael Jacobson was president of the Vera Institute of Justice, serving from 2005 to 2013. He is the author of Downsizing Prisons: How to Reduce Crime and End Mass Incarceration.

Holding a Ph.D. in sociology, he has had an ongoing academic career coupled with more than 20 years of government service. From 1998 to 2005 he was a professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice and the Graduate Center of CUNY. He was New York City correction commissioner from 1995 to 1998, New York City probation commissioner from 1992 to 1996, and worked in the New York City Office of Management and Budget from 1984 to 1992 where he was a deputy budget director.

In 2010 to 2012, Michael served as the chair of Altus, a global alliance working across continents and from a multicultural perspective to improve public safety and justice.

Professor and Chair, Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice, University of Maryland, College Park

Jim Lynch is professor and chair of the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Maryland. Lynch joined the department after serving as the director of the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) in the United States Department of Justice. Previously, he was a distinguished professor in the Department of Criminal Justice at John Jay College, City University of New York. He was a professor in the Department of Justice, Law and Society at American University from 1986 to 2005 and chair of that department from 2003 to 2005.

Lynch's research focuses on victim surveys, victimization risk, the role of coercion in social control, and crime statistics. He has published four books and numerous articles many of them dealing with crime statistics. He was vice president-elect of the American Society of Criminology (ASC) and served on the Committee on Law and Justice Statistics of the American Statistical Association. From 2008 to 2010 he was co-editor of the Journal of Quantitative Criminology.

Lynch received his B.A. degree from Wesleyan University and his M.A. and Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago.

Professor and Department Chair, Department of Criminology, School of Ecology, University of California, Irvine

Mona Lynch is a professor of Criminology, Law & Society, School of Ecology, at University of California, Irvine. Mona Lynch's research and writing focuses on the social, psychological, and cultural dynamics of contemporary criminal adjudication and punishment processes. She uses multiple methodological approaches, including experimental design, ethnographic field methods, and archival and other social artifactual analysis to explore research questions of interest. She co-directs, with Catherine Fisk (UCI-Law), the Center in Law, Society and Culture, and serves as vice-chair of the Department of Criminology, Law and Society.

Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Criminology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia

Dr. Greg Ridgeway is an Associate Professor of Criminology and Statistics and Director of the M.S. Program in Criminology at the University of Pennsylvania. His research involves the development of statistical, computational, and analytical methods to improve our understanding of crime and the functioning of the justice system. At the same time he has great interest in putting those methods into practice. His methods have been put into place in police departments, including Cincinnati, Los Angeles, and New York City, in federal public defender organizations, and in drug treatment program evaluations.

Greg's leadership experience in running research organizations in the public and private sectors is well suited for teaching and mentoring students with career aspirations in public service, research organizations, or academia.

Prior to coming to Penn, Greg was the Acting Director of the National Institute of Justice, and as such, a member of the Senior Executive Service, the highest leadership position in the federal government's civil service. NIJ is the Justice Department’s science agency with 80 employees and a budget of $250M and charged with strengthening the social, physical, and forensic sciences in order to improve our understanding of crime and advance justice. While leading NIJ, Greg implemented many reforms to clarify the scientific focus of the institute and implemented initiatives including a $75M school safety research program.

Previously, Greg was Director of the RAND Safety and Justice Program and the RAND Center on Quality Policing where he worked with numerous criminal justice organizations around the world.

Greg is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association, a distinction he received for being one of the world’s foremost statisticians engaged in crime research. He is the inventor on seven awarded U.S. patents.

Professor, Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Georgia Sate University, Atlanta

Dr. William Sabol is a VP at Westat. Bill is a former Director of the Bureau of Justice Statistics at the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ).

Bill has more than 30 years of professional experience in criminal justice research and policy. As Acting Chief of the National Crime Victimization Survey Unit and Chief of the Corrections Statistics Unit, Bill was responsible for managing data collection and statistical operations, developing administrative records, publishing statistical reports, and coordinating and implementing comprehensive statistical program plans. He served earlier as Acting Director of the DOJ National Institute of Justice.

Prior to his tenure at DOJ, Bill was with the Government Accountability Office as Assistant Director, Homeland Security and Justice. His earlier experience includes Associate Director of the Center on Urban Poverty and Social Change at Case Western Reserve University, and Senior Research Associate at the Urban Institute.

While earning his Ph.D. in Policy Research and Analysis at the University of Pittsburgh, Bill was a Fulbright Scholar at Cambridge University.

Foundation Professor and Director of Graduate Programs, School of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Arizona State University, Phoenix

Cassia Spohn is a Foundation professor and director of the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice. She received her Ph.D. in political science from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in 1978.

Prior to joining the faculty at Arizona State University, she was a Professor in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, where she served as director of graduate studies for 12 years and as department chair for one year.

Cassia is the author of the book How Do Judges Decide? The Search for Fairness and Justice in Punishment. She is also the co-author of several books, including Drugs, Crime and Justice; Policing and Prosecuting Sexual Assault: Inside the Criminal Justice System; The Color of Justice: Race, Ethnicity, and Crime in America; and Rape Law Reform: A Grassroots Movement and Its Impact.

She has published more than 100 articles on topics such as the effects of race/ethnicity and sex on state and federal sentencing decisions, sentencing of drug offenders, case processing decisions in sexual assault cases, and the deterrent effect of imprisonment. Her work has been supported by the National Science Foundation, the National Institute of Justice, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

In 1987 her research was cited by the U.S. Supreme Court in the landmark case, McCleskey v. Kemp. In 2011 she was named an ASU Foundation Professor and in 2013 she was awarded ASU’s Faculty Achievement Award for Defining Edge Research in Social Sciences. She has been the editor of Justice Quarterly since 2011.

Policing Council

The Measures for Justice Policing Council is a senior advisory group comprised of some of the most experienced minds in the area of policing in the United States. The MFJ Policing Council provides guidance on the integration of policing measures into MFJ's platform. Current Policing Council members include:

Chief of Police, Houston Police Department (TX)

Art Acevedo was sworn-in as Chief of the Houston Police Department (HPD) in November 2016, becoming the first Hispanic to ever lead the organization. Prior to assuming leadership of HPD, Acevedo served nine years as Chief of the Austin Police Department. Chief Acevedo is a proponent of community policing and holds various leadership positions with the Major Cities Chiefs Association and the International Association of Chiefs of Police.

President, National Police Foundation

Jim Burch joined the Police Foundation in early 2015 as the Foundation’s Vice President for Strategic Initiatives and Executive Vice President and was named President of the Foundation in April 2019. As such, Mr. Burch oversees the Foundation’s efforts to advance policing through innovations in practice and technology. Prior to joining the Foundation, Mr. Burch served for more than 20 years at the U.S. Department of Justice, having been appointed to various senior executive and leadership positions.

Chief of Police, Tempe Police Department (AZ)

Sylvia Moir joined the Tempe Police Department (TPD) as Chief in March 2016. Prior to that, Chief Moir served as Chief of the El Cerrito Police Department (CA) for six years. In her 31-year career with law enforcement, Chief Moir has been a strong proponent of adding implicit-bias-awareness and mindfulness training to police curricula. She is currently an Executive Fellow for the Police Foundation, the Vice President of The Police Executive Research Forum (PERF), and on the Community Policing Committee of the International Association of Chiefs of Police.

Chief of Police, Seaside Police Department (CA)

Abdul Pridgen was appointed as Seaside Chief of Police in March 2018. Chief Pridgen retired from the Fort Worth Police Department after almost 26 years of honorable service. He founded the Institute for Transparent and Accountable Policing in 2017. Chief Pridgen has a passion for community engagement, collaboration, transparency, inclusivity, creative community policing programs, and procedural justice.

Professor of Criminology, Law and Society, George Mason University

Laurie O. Robinson joined George Mason University in 2012 as the Clarence J. Robinson Professor of Criminology, Law and Society after more than three decades of involvement in national criminal justice policy. In 2014, she was named by then-President Obama to co-chair the President’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing. Robinson headed the U.S. Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs during the Clinton and Obama administrations. Earlier in her career, Robinson spent 14 years as director of the American Bar Association’s Section of Criminal Justice.

Chief of Police, Charleston Police Department (SC)

Luther T. Reynolds was appointed Chief of Police of the Charleston Police Department in April 2018, following 29 years of professional law enforcement experience serving the residents of Montgomery County, Maryland. Chief Reynolds has worked with highly diverse communities, to include those representing over 150 languages and an even larger number of cultures. Throughout his career he has lead personnel, training, special operations, and patrol bureau divisions.

Professor Emeritus of Criminology, Law and Justice, University of Illinois Chicago

Dennis P. Rosenbaum served as Department Head, Center Director and Dean. He was Chair of the Division of Policing for the American Society of Criminology. He aims to bridge the gap between research and law enforcement practices in community policing, procedural justice, hot spots policing, police accountability and oversight, training, and interagency partnerships. For eight years he directed the National Police Research Platform, funded by NIJ, to advance the current state of knowledge and practice through standardized metrics. He is the Compliance Officer in Portland, Oregon and Associate Monitor in Chicago, Illinois.

Professor Emeritus, Department of Political Science, Northwestern University

Wesley Skogan studies community policing, fairness and effectiveness in policing, crime prevention, and criminal victimization. He received the 2015 Distinguished Achievement Award in Evidence-Based Crime Policy from the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy. This award is the center’s highest honor and recognizes individuals who have made a significant contribution and commitment to advance the integration of science with criminal justice practice.

Director and Chief Counsel, Police Benevolent & Protective Association of Illinois, and the Police Benevolent Labor Committee

Sean Smoot is responsible for the provision of legal services for over 7,500 legal defense plan participants. He regularly represents police officers in Police & Fire Board and Merit Commission discipline and discharge cases, as well as Section 1983 Civil Rights Litigation, Unfair Labor Practices, Grievance Arbitration, and Interest Arbitration cases. Mr. Smoot also acts as the organizations primary legislative advocate on issues related to policing, public safety, and public employee labor issues.

Former Chief of Police, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department (NC), and former Executive Director, Major Cities Chiefs Association

Darrel Stephens served as Executive Director of the Major Cities Chiefs Association between 2010 and 2018. He is an accomplished police executive with 50 years of experience, including nine years as the Chief of the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department. He served as the President, Vice President and Legislative Committee Chair of the Major Cities Police Chiefs Association while Chief in Charlotte. He has received many honors and awards, including the Sir Robert Peel Medal for Evidence Based Policing from the Police Executive Program at Cambridge University.

Former Assistant Chief of Special Operations, Seattle Police Department (WA), and former National President, National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives (NOBLE)

Perry Tarrant has over three decades of law enforcement experience. He spent 34 years with the Tucson Police Department, where he held assignments in patrol, canine, SWAT, bomb squad, aviation, and internal affairs. In 2015, Mr. Tarrant joined the Seattle Police Department as Assistant Chief of Special Operations. He was named National President of the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives (NOBLE) in 2016.

Director of City Solutions, Results for America

Dr. Clarence Wardell III is currently the Director of City Solutions at Results for America where he supports Bloomberg Philanthropies’ What Works Cities Initiative. In that role, he works with cities across the country to scale innovative solutions and build their capacity to use data and evidence to guide decision making. Prior to that, he was a member of the U.S. Digital Service at the Obama White House, where he co-led the White House Police Data Initiative aimed at using open data as a means to increase trust and engagement between law enforcement and the communities they serve.

Data Council

The Data Council, established in 2011, was comprised of measurement experts with diverse expertise in the judicial system (experts on the judiciary, the bench, indigent defense, race in the courts, etc.) who helped isolate useful indicators of system performance and from them developed MFJ’s initial set of measures. Data Council members included:

Chief Executive Officer, Measures for Justice

Amy Bach has been the Chief Executive Officer of Measures for Justice since 2011. She founded the organization as a follow-up to her acclaimed book, Ordinary Injustice: How America Holds Court, which won the 2010 Robert F. Kennedy Book Award. In June 2011, Echoing Green, a premier seed investor for social entrepreneurs, selected Amy as a Fellow out of 3,000 candidates worldwide to support the launch of Measures for Justice. Following that, she was named a Draper Richards Kaplan Social Entrepreneur. For her work on Ordinary Injustice, Amy received a Soros Media Fellowship, a special J. Anthony Lukas citation, and a Radcliffe Fellowship at Harvard University. Amy was a Knight Foundation Journalism Fellow at Yale Law School and is a graduate of Stanford Law School. In 2012, she taught Criminal Law during the spring semester at the University of Buffalo Law School as a Visiting Professor. In 2019, she won the Academy of Criminal Justice Science's Leadership and Innovation Award and the Charles Bronfman Prize. Amy lives in Rochester, NY, where the organization is based.

District Attorney, Milwaukee County

John Chisholm is the District Attorney of Milwaukee County. His office handles criminal cases for the State of Wisconsin in the Milwaukee County Circuit Court. Prior to being elected as Milwaukee County District Attorney, he was an Assistant Milwaukee County District Attorney, responsible for violent crime, drug, and firearm prosecutions.

John chairs the Association of Prosecuting Attorneys based in Washington, D.C., and serves on the Milwaukee Homicide Review Commission, Community Justice Council, Safe & Sound, and Milwaukee Addiction Treatment Initiative boards, and is past chair of the Milwaukee High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area board.

Assistant Vice President, Data Analytics, Jewish Child Care Association, New York

Derek Coursen joined Public Health Solutions in 2007, and currently directs informatics for the administration of New York City’s portfolio of HIV care and prevention contracts. He was previously Director of Information Management at the Vera Institute of Justice, where he co-led projects that developed indicators for New York State’s juvenile justice system and New York City’s child welfare court filings.

Derek has published several articles on data modeling in public service settings, and he has a particular focus on information system design in relation to diverse stakeholder purposes around operations, performance measurement and evaluation.

Director of Innovation, Measures for Justice

Dr. Gipsy Escobar has extensive multidisciplinary criminal justice research experience designing and managing complex research projects, mentoring staff, and communicating research results to varied audiences. As MFJ's Director of Research and Analytics (2015 to 2018) she worked with national experts to design and validate a system of performance measurement for local criminal justice and to develop a robust methodology to standardize the management of criminal justice data from varied sources across jurisdictions in the United States. Currently, as MFJ's Director of Innovation, she focuses on developing partnerships with practitioners and organizations in the criminal justice space, exploring innovative ways to improve upon the performance measurement system (from data intake to publication), and providing expertise to states working on legislative and executive initiatives to close the criminal justice data gap. She also directs the Data Fellowship Team that is providing technical assistance for the implementation of criminal justice data transparency legislation in a Judicial Circuit in Florida.

Before joining MFJ, Dr. Escobar was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology and a faculty member of the Graduate School at Loyola University Chicago. She received her Ph.D. from John Jay College of Criminal Justice and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. Her research interests include crime and justice measurement, court case processing, prosecutorial decision-making, program evaluation, and the spatial study of crime correlates at the community level.

Research Director, North Carolina Office of Indigent Defense Services (IDS), Durham, NC

Since 2001, Margaret Gressens has been the Research Director for the Office of Indigent Defense Services. From 1996 to 2000, Margaret was a Health Planner for the Municipality of Anchorage, Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), where she directed a project that measured the health and quality of life of the municipality.

She was Assistant Director of the Real Security Education Project for the Institute for Policy Studies in Washington, D.C., where she co-designed a research and education project on the impact of U.S. foreign policy on the U.S. and the international economy. She has also worked for the Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska, and for the Office of United States Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan (NY), Washington, D.C.

Principal, Court Metrics, Williamsburg, VA (former Senior Justice Reform Specialist at the World Bank and former Vice-President of the National Center for State Courts)

Ingo Keilitz is Senior Justice Reform Specialist at the World Bank. From 2010-2012 he was principal court research consultant at the National Center for State Courts (NCSC) in Williamsburg, Virginia, where he was vice president 1990 – 1995b. From 1995 to 2010, he headed CourtMetrics, a management consulting firm specializing in performance measurement and management in the justice sector.

Over the last ten years, he has focused on helping justice systems throughout the world build court performance measurement and management systems. Ingo is a major contributor to the development of court performance standards and measures, including: Appellate CourTools (2009), the CourTools (2005), the Trial Court Performance Standards with Commentary (1995), the Trial Courts Performance Standards and Measurement System (1997), the Family Court Performance Standards and Measures (1999), Quality Counts: A Manual of Family Court Performance Measurement (2001), the National Probate Court Standards (1993), the Guidelines for State Court Decision Making in Life-Sustaining Medical Treatment Cases (1992), and the Guidelines for Involuntary Civil Commitment (1986). He is co-inventor of CourtMetrix, a computer-based court performance dashboard produced by ACS, Inc.

His book, Made to Measure: Developing Court Metrics and Building Performance Measurement Systems, is scheduled to be published next year.

Vice President and Research Director, Vera Institute of Justice, New York

Jim Parsons is the Vice President and Research Director at the Vera Institute of Justice and Principal Investigator in Vera’s International Indicators Group. Among other projects, he is currently directing research on the impact of recent reforms to drug law sentencing policies in New York City, developing research led jail reentry initiatives in New York and Los Angeles, and working with criminal justice and behavioral health agencies in Washington, D.C., to inform the provision of forensic substance use and mental health treatment services.

Jim’s international work includes a project for the United Nations to develop and test indicators of justice system performance for use in post-conflict settings, and a long-term initiative to develop and evaluate justice system reform projects in China.

Jim has published on empirical research methods for improving justice systems, jail reentry services, the use of indicators to evaluate justice system performance, and public health interventions targeting substance users.

Associate Professor, Chairperson and Director of Sociolegal Studies Minor, Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Loyola University Chicago

Don Stemen is an Associate Professor in the Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology at Loyola University Chicago. For three years, he was MFJ’s first Consulting Director of Research & Analytics responsible for shaping MFJ’s research agenda, heightening its real-world impact, strengthening its research funding base, and promoting and sustaining collaboration with MFJ’s government and private partners.

Prior to joining Loyola in 2007, he was the Director of Research for Sentencing and Corrections at the Vera Institute of Justice. His research explores the innovation and diffusion of sentencing and corrections policies in the United States, the macro-level intersection between sentencing policies and imprisonment, and the micro-level impact of sentencing policies on the use of discretion. He has completed numerous federally-funded and foundation-funded projects examining the effects of sentencing policies on incarceration rates in the United States, the impact of mandatory treatment and probation programs on recidivism, and the decision-making processes of prosecutors.

Assistant Professor, John Jay College, New York

Valerie West is an Assistant Professor at John Jay College. Prior to John Jay, Valerie was a Senior Research Analyst at the Center for Crime Community & the Law at Columbia University School of Law, and the Center for Violence Research and Prevention at Columbia University School of Public Health. Her research and scholarship have focused on the interaction of crime, inequality, law, and social policy.

Valerie has written extensively on the role of race and place in: capital sentencing; the re-adoption of capital punishment; the capital review process; and incarceration. She is currently examining the neighborhood effects of incarceration and race on voting participation (registration and turnout) in New York City between 1990 and 2002. In addition, she is researching the influence of race on clearance rates for capital homicide and capital sentencing. She is also developing a long-term research project on incarceration and community disenfranchisement.

Advisory Committee

The MFJ Advisory Committee provides crucial strategic guidance for the organization with a particular focus on fundraising and developing a model to expand the Measures and generate revenue.

Director Emeritus, McKinsey & Company

Lenny Mendonca is a director emeritus (retired senior partner) from the Washington D.C. and San Francisco offices of McKinsey & Company, a global management consulting firm. Lenny founded McKinsey’s U.S. state and local public sector practice. For many years Lenny led the Firm’s knowledge development efforts overseeing the McKinsey Global Institute and the Firm’s communications, which includes the McKinsey Quarterly, and served for a decade on the McKinsey Shareholder Council (its board of directors). His client work focused on service to public sector organizations, and over the course of his career he helped dozens of government, corporate, and nonprofit clients solve their most difficult management challenges.

Lenny is the Chair of Children Now, co-Chair of California Forward, and founder and Chair of Fusecorps. He is the Chair Emeritus of the Bay Area Council and the Economic Institute of the Bay Area, and was vice-chair of the Stanford Graduate School of Business Advisory Council. He serves on the boards of The New America Foundation, The Committee for Economic Development, Common Cause, the Bay Area Science and Innovation Consortium, and The California Business for Educational Excellence Foundation. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the Board of Trustees for Junior Statesmen of America.

He received his MBA and certificate in public management from the Stanford Graduate School of Business. He holds an AB, magna cum laude, in economics from Harvard College. Lenny lives on the Half Moon Bay coast, south of San Francisco, with his wife and two daughters, where he is the founder and owner of the Half Moon Bay Brewing Company.

President and CEO of Rhiza, Pittsburgh, PA

Josh Knauer has been a social entrepreneur for the past 20 years, creating and leading successful organizations in both the non-profit and for-profit sectors. His ability to spot emerging trends in technology and how they can be used for the betterment of society and the environment have caused him to be considered a leading expert in the field. In the Spring of 2010, Josh was appointed by the Obama Administration to a working group of President Obama’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology.

Prior to Rhiza Labs, Josh led MAYA Design’s Information Commons project. Before that, he founded and served as CEO of Green Marketplace, a clearing-house for socially and environmentally responsible products, services and information, which he sold to Gaiam in 2002. In 1991, Josh founded and served as Executive Director of the EnviroLink Network, a nonprofit foundation dedicated to helping organizations adopt emerging technologies, and was one of the first .orgs on the Internet.

Philanthropist and Founder of Social Venture Network, New York

Josh Mailman, veteran angel investor and philanthropist, has made over 80 early-stage investments for both himself and on behalf of friends who he advises.

In 1999, the Mailman family endowed $33 million to fund the Columbia Mailman School of Public Health. In 1987, Mr. Mailman and fellow philanthropist Wayne Silby founded Social Venture Network. SVN is dedicated to inspiring a community of business and social leaders to build a just economy and sustainable planet. SVN has spawned other similar and successful ventures specializing in investments for social good, including Investors’ Circle, Net Impact, and the Threshold Foundation.

In addition to ongoing board activities (Blacksmith Institute, Human Rights Watch, the Fund for Global Human Rights, Sierra Madre Alliance, Witness) and sitting on the Sigrid Rausing Trust, U.K. and the Joshua Mailman Foundation, Josh is creating a program to support Muslim Social Entrepreneurs in the Middle East, and managing Serious Change LP, a global for-profit social venture fund.

Cofounder, Sunlight Foundation, Washington, DC

Ellen S. Miller is the cofounder and former executive director of the Sunlight Foundation, a Washington-based, non-partisan non-profit dedicated to using the power of the Internet to catalyze greater government openness and transparency. She is the founder of two other prominent Washington-based organizations in the field of money and politics — the Center for Responsive Politics and Public Campaign — and a nationally recognized expert on transparency and the influence of money in politics. Her experience as a Washington advocate for more than 35 years spans the worlds of non-profit advocacy, grassroots activism, and journalism.

Ellen serves on the Board of Directors of Publish What You Fund and Heaven Hill Distilleries. She is a member of the Policy Advisory Council of Transparency International, U.S.

Family Reach Foundation and CND Life Sciences

Rick joined CND Life Sciences as CEO in early 2020 and brings 25 years of experience with health and life sciences companies, serving in senior executive roles globally for medical device, digital health, and diagnostics firms. Prior to joining CND as CEO, Rick was the Global President of Life Sciences at Aptus Health, a former subsidiary of Merck, Inc. (acquired by WebMD) and CEO of Plasma Surgical, an innovative medical device company with technology used in open and laparoscopic procedures around the world. Rick began his career in strategy consulting, rising to Partner at Mercer Management Consulting where he helped build the Health & Life Sciences Practice and managed large biopharma and diagnostics clients. A Kellogg MBA and graduate of the University of Virginia, Rick also founded and helped grow three nonprofit organizations that have raised nearly $100 million in the last decade to fulfill health and social impact missions including Family Reach Foundation, which was included in the Obama White House’s Cancer Moonshot in 2016.

Rick received a Bachelor of Arts in economics from the University of Virginia and an MBA from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University.

California Advisory Council

To assist its efforts in California and ensure that they are responsive to local issues, MFJ has formed an Advisory Council comprised of respected stakeholders from and experts on the California criminal justice system (judiciary, law enforcement, public defender, prosecution, administrative offices of the courts, academics, etc.).

The Council will support MFJ’s California work by: helping with outreach out to data owners; sharing key thoughts and concerns regarding the data and Measures; speaking on behalf of the constituencies it represents and; serving as a liaison, answering questions others may have about Measures for Justice.

President, Police Foundation

Jim Bueermann is the president of the Police Foundation, a national, nonpartisan, nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting innovation and improvement in policing through its research, technical assistance, training, professional services, and communication programs. As president, Bueermann directs all foundation operations and is a voting member of the board of directors. Jim Bueermann worked for the Redlands Police Department for 33 years, serving in every unit within the department. He was appointed chief of police and director of Housing, Recreation and Senior Services in 1998. He retired in June 2011. As chief, he developed a holistic approach to community policing and problem solving that consolidated housing and recreation services into the police department and was based on risk and protective factor research into adolescent problem prevention. This strategy was recognized as one of the country’s 25 most innovative programs in the 2000 Innovations in American Government program sponsored by Harvard’s Kennedy School. Jim was the first police chief to be inducted as an honorary fellow in the Academy of Experimental Criminology and into the halls of fame at George Mason University’s Center for Evidence Based Crime Policy and the School of Behavioral Science at California State University, San Bernardino. He is on policing advisory boards at Cambridge University, George Mason University, John Jay College, and the Council for State Governments and works extensively in the field of evidence-based policing, innovative technologies, and prisoner reentry. Prior to coming to the Police Foundation, he was an executive fellow with the US Department of Justice’s National Institute of Justice and a senior fellow at George Mason University. He is a graduate of California State University, San Bernardino, the University of Redlands, the FBI National Academy, and the California Command College.

Former Special Assistant Attorney General, California Department of Justice

Currently Vice President of Strategy, Policy & Legal at Voyage - an autonomous vehicle start-up working to deploy AV technology in local communities, starting with retirement communities. Justin leads go-to-market strategy, product policy, regulatory engagement, communications, and legal. He came over from Uber where he was Head of Policy for Autonomous Vehicles & Urban Aviation. He previously served as the Principal Tech & data Advisor to Attorney General Kamala D. Harris at the California Department of Justice. He has also worked at McKinsey & Co. as a strategy consultant and clerked on the 11th Circuit of the Federal Judiciary. He holds a J.D. from NYU School of Law and a B.A. from Harvard College.

Judge, Ret., Contra Costa County Superior Court

Judge Grossman was appointed to the Bay Judicial District Municipal Court, in Richmond, CA, in January, 1991. He became a Superior Court Judge, in June, 1998, via court unification. He retired, in 2012, after 21 years of judicial service, primarily assigned to criminal matters. Since his retirement, he has been very active in criminal justice policy and advocacy matters.

Judge Grossman grew up in San Diego, California, and graduated from the University of California San Diego. He earned his law degree, at age 22, from the University of San Diego, School of Law. Following his admission to the State Bar of California, he became a Special Agent of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. As a Special Agent, for six and one half years, he was assigned to matters in: Albuquerque and Gallup, New Mexico; Monterey, California; Madison, WI. Thereafter, he began a successful nine year career as a prosecutor with the: Contra Costa County District Attorney’s Office; U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Rights Division, Criminal Section; U.S. Attorney’s Office, Northern District of California, Organized Crime and Drug Enforcement Task Force.

As a judge, he was a leader in the drug court field, helping to create the Supervised Treatment And Recovery (STAR) Adult Drug Court Program. He attended a training at the International Judicial Academy at The Hague and served as a panelist for the U.S. Department of Justice Office of Overseas Prosecutorial Development, Assistance and Training sponsored Plea Bargaining Procedures Program in Serbia. In 2015, he gave a three day presentation to trial court judges in Timor Leste.

Judge Grossman currently serves as: an at-large member of the Contra Costa Racial Justice Task Force; a member of Contra Costa Youth Justice Initiative Steering Committee; a member of the Prison Law Office Board of Directors; a member of the Leadership Contra Costa Alumni Association Advisory Board. He has previously served as: a member of the 2016 Contra Costa Cohort to the Government Alliance on Race and Equity; a member (and chair) of the Contra Costa Community Advisory Board to the Community Corrections Partnership; a member (and chair) of the healthRIGHT360 Board of Directors; a member (and chair) of the YMCA of the East Bay, West Contra Costa Branch Board of Directors.

Director, Children’s Data Network & Associate Professor, USC School of Social Work

EMILY PUTNAM-HORNSTEIN joined the faculty in 2011 after completing her doctoral studies at the University of California, Berkeley. She currently directs the Children’s Data Network, an agency, university and community collaborative funded by First 5 LA and the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation (co-director: Jacquelyn McCroskey). The Children’s Data Network provides a platform for the linkage and analysis of large-scale, administrative data sources to inform children’s policies and programs. Putnam-Hornstein also maintains an appointment at the UC Berkeley California Child Welfare Indicators Project, a long-standing child welfare data and research collaboration with the California Department of Social Services.

Putnam-Hornstein’s current research focuses on the application of epidemiological methods to improve the surveillance of non-fatal and fatal child abuse and neglect, offering insight into where scarce public resources may be most efficiently targeted and informing an understanding of vulnerable children within a broader, population-based context. She is a member of the Data Linkage Committee for California’s Child Welfare Council, the California Vital Statistics Advisory and Vital Records Protection Committee, and serves as the state-appointed co-chair of the Data and Performance Measurement and Outcomes Work Group (California Continuum of Care Reform Initiative, Senate Bill 1013). Her teaching interests include quantitative methods, child and family policy, and child welfare practice. Putnam-Hornstein graduated from Yale with a BA in Psychology, received her MSW from Columbia University, and earned her PhD in Social Welfare from UC Berkeley.

President and CEO, California Forward

Jim Mayer is President & CEO of California Forward, a bipartisan public interest effort to bolster democracy and improve the performance of government in California. Working with civic and governmental partners statewide, CA Fwd has been the consistent advocate for comprehensive governance reforms that will lead to better results and accountability. As its chief executive, Mayer has helped to usher California’s modernization of redistricting, primary elections, term limits, ethics and transparency laws – to empower voters, encourage bipartisan solutions and restore public trust. He shepherded CA Fwd’s efforts to build capacity within governments to improve outcomes, and to advance a shared agenda among private, civic and public sector leaders to sustainably and equitable increase prosperity.

For a decade, Mayer was a daily newspaper journalist chronicling public problems. For another decade, Mayer staffed and led an independent and bipartisan state commission charged with reviewing programs and policies and recommending reforms to the Governor and the Legislature. And for the most recent decade, Mayer has helmed a civic effort to close the gap between what state and local agencies are getting done – and what they need to get done to reduce poverty and restore upward mobility, to create sustainable and equitable communities, and to support competitive and resilient regional economies.

As a journalist with The Press-Tribune in Placer County, The Bakersfield Californian and The Sacramento Bee, Mayer was recognized statewide for his coverage of education and natural resource issues. While a project manager, deputy director and executive director of the Little Hoover Commission, he was involved in more than 30 comprehensive reviews of government policies and operations.

At CA Fwd, he has worked with volunteer leaders and a statewide team of staff and consultants to mature solutions from ideas to implementation – from fiscal procedures to specific programs focused on public health, safety and education.

He is a graduate of Diablo Valley College and California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo. He earned a master’s in public policy from California State University, Sacramento and was a fellow at the University of Michigan.

Director Emeritus, McKinsey & Company

Lenny Mendonca is a director emeritus (retired senior partner) from the Washington D.C. and San Francisco offices of McKinsey & Company, a global management consulting firm. Lenny founded McKinsey’s U.S. state and local public sector practice. For many years Lenny led the Firm’s knowledge development efforts overseeing the McKinsey Global Institute and the Firm’s communications, which includes the McKinsey Quarterly, and served for a decade on the McKinsey Shareholder Council (its board of directors). His client work focused on service to public sector organizations, and over the course of his career he helped dozens of government, corporate, and nonprofit clients solve their most difficult management challenges.

Lenny is the Chair of Children Now, co-Chair of California Forward, and founder and Chair of Fusecorps. He is the Chair Emeritus of the Bay Area Council and the Economic Institute of the Bay Area, and was vice-chair of the Stanford Graduate School of Business Advisory Council. He serves on the boards of The New America Foundation, The Committee for Economic Development, Common Cause, the Bay Area Science and Innovation Consortium, and The California Business for Educational Excellence Foundation. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the Board of Trustees for Junior Statesmen of America.

He received his MBA and certificate in public management from the Stanford Graduate School of Business. He holds an AB, magna cum laude, in economics from Harvard College. Lenny lives on the Half Moon Bay coast, south of San Francisco, with his wife and two daughters, where he is the founder and owner of the Half Moon Bay Brewing Company.

Owner, O’Connell Research, Inc

In Kevin’s Words: Policy and data analytic professional with experience moving data-driven projects and complex policies forward. I enjoy being a connector and use my inter-personal skills to facilitate common understanding among stakeholders, and my technology skills to facilitate shared solutions to challenges.

About O’Connell Research: O’Connell Research Services is a comprehensive research, evaluation, and data planning organization committed to helping organizations succeed by using information to drive better planning and project success.

Past projects have included research briefs on California’s Realignment Policy, criminal justice data visualizations, and providing technical assistance to counties implementing cost benefit model for effective programs.

Founder Kevin O’Connell has 10 years of experience in quantitative public policy.

Professor of Public Policy, UC Berkeley

Steven Raphael is a Professor of Public Policy at UC Berkeley and holds the James D. Marver Chair at the Goldman School of Public Policy. His research focuses on the economics of low-wage labor markets, housing, and the economics of crime and corrections. His most recent research focuses on the social consequences of the large increases in U.S. incarceration rates and racial disparities in criminal justice outcomes. Raphael also works on immigration policy, research questions pertaining to various aspects of racial inequality, the economics of labor unions, social insurance policies, homelessness, and low-income housing. Raphael is the author (with Michael Stoll) of Why Are so Many Americans in Prison? (published by the Russell Sage Foundation Press) and The New Scarlet Letter? Negotiating the U.S. Labor Market with a Criminal Record (published by the W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research). Raphael is research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research, the California Policy Lab, the University of Michigan National Poverty Center, the University of Chicago Crime Lab, IZA, Bonn Germany, and the Public Policy Institute of California. Raphael holds a Ph.D. in economics from UC Berkeley.

Assistant Professor, Criminology, Law & Society, UCI School of Social Ecology

In Bryan’s Words: I am an Assistant Professor in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society (and, by courtesy, Sociology and Public Health); a Faculty Affiliate in The Center for Demographic and Social Analysis, The Center for Evidence-Based Corrections, and The Center for Biotechnology and Global Health Policy at the University of California-Irvine; a Research Affiliate in the Center for Demography and Ecology (CDE) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; and a Member of the Racial Democracy, Crime and Justice Network (RDCJN) at Rutgers University and the Scholars Strategy Network. I have been a National Science Foundation Minority Post-Doctoral Research Fellow at the University of Washington, a Visiting Scholar in the Department of Demography at UC-Berkeley and in the Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP) at UW-Madison, and a Research Associate at the National Economics Research Associates (in the Sampling and Survey Division), the National Board of Medical Examiners (in Operations Research), and Nickerson & Associates LLC (in Statistical and Econometric Analysis).

My research focuses on demography and criminology, broadly defined, with particular interests in fertility, mortality, population health, mass imprisonment, and social inequality. I apply and develop demographic, statistical, and mixed methodologies to understand changing patterns of inequality — nationally and abroad. My research has appeared in social science and medical journals.

I am currently collaborating on three projects. The first project assesses how mass incarceration has affected measures of social inequality and demographic processes (fertility, mortality, and morbidity) among subpopulations with the highest risk of criminal justice contact in America, which has led to the development of new demographic methods for multiple-partner fertility; new statistical methods for estimating mortality in differential population environments; and new sampling weights for national surveys that exclude marginal populations. The second project investigates how national, regional, and global patterns of mortality, morbidity, and injuries have changed over time. The final project is a multi-state mixed-method data collection effort to assess the legal history and social consequences of monetary sanctions across different jurisdictions within the United States, which has led to new sampling methods for dual design studies.